New editors wanted

Dear fellow linguists,

Our university has its very own (under)graduate journal for linguistics: LingUU Journal. This is a journal where you, students, can publish papers you are proud of, or papers in which you show something that more people should read, other than just your teacher.

Since the academic year is progressing swiftly, we are looking for new members for our editorial board!

What can LingUU Journal offer you?
A position in the editorial board of LingUU offers the possibility to take a look inside the organisation of scientific publications, gain knowledge on good (academic) writing and develop your organisational abilities.

Interested? We are looking for students that would like to fill the following positions:

  • Senior editor (division of tasks regarding submitted manuscripts, keep track of the status of manuscripts, assistance of the editors in chief, various other editorial tasks)
  • Secretary(write minutes, create and manage archives, manage e-mails and distribute the issues)
  • Treasurer (attracts financial support, takes care of orders and manages the budget of the journal)
  • Designer & webmaster (management of the journal’s layout and website)
  • Editor (search for and approach contributors, solicit manuscripts, revise submitted content)

Are you interested in linguistics, science in general, and the distribution of knowledge, and would you like to be involved in a student journal? Send an e-mail to linguu.gw@uu.nl before June 12, 2019. Your e-mail must consist of the following parts:

  • Name and surname;
  • Current study;
  • Field(s) of interest within linguistics (e.g. phonetics);
  • Post(s) of interest;
  • Short motivation;
  • An indication of the time you would like to be part of the board (e.g. one year).

Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions at all. We are looking forward to see your application.

Warm regards,

Mandy de Kuiper and Myrthe van der Veen 
Editors in chief of LingUU: (undergraduate) journal of Linguistics

LingUU 3.1 out now!

LingUU 3.1 is out now! The fourth issue of LingUU Journal features articles on various linguistic topics, written by students from different BA and MA programmes. Download the entire issue, browse through the contents, or order a paper copy (while supplies last).

Thanks to our authors, reviewers and advisory board, and special thanks to our founding mothers: Sophie Slaats and Fieneke Jochemsen!

Anouk Scheffer (RMA Linguistics) proposes a study on the effect of stress cues on mapping meaning to newly segmented words. This study focuses on monolingual and bilingual infants of 17 months old, learning both an iambic and trochaic language. Anouk suggests a way in which both word segmentation and the ability to map meaning to words can be examined.

Héloïse Pierret (RMA Linguistics) discusses the role of prosocial deception (‘white lies’) in maintaining a good communicative project. She argues that prosocial deception plays a role in manipulating and protecting the emotions of others. To visualize the role of deception in communication, Héloïse adapted the Affective Language Comprehension (ALC) model by Van Berkum (2018). She argues that a circular categorization should be used to classify deception types.

Iris van der Wulp (RMA Linguistics) explains the split-ergativity in Thulung Rai and compares it to the split-ergativity in auxiliary selection in Italian. When the expression of split-ergativity in Thulung Rai and Italian is compared, one finds almost only differences. They both have a form of split-ergativity, however, Italian expresses ergativity by auxiliary selection, whereas Thulung Rai expresses it by morphologically marked Case.

Japanese has emotions embedded at the core of its structure, in the shape of morphological elements. Damien Fleur’s (RMA Linguistics) paper reviews the literature on two such elements, namely the sentence-final particles ne and no. Through the prism of the Japanese society and with examples from Van Berkum’s ALC model (2018), this review investigates how these interactional particles ultimately perform in emotional communication.

Marjolein Talsma (RMA Linguistics) reports enthusiastically on her internship on the valency of weather verbs at her home-base, Utrecht University.

A little further away from home, Anique Schüller (RMA Linguistics) went on exchange to the Chinese University of Hong Kong to study cross-language activation in deaf bimodal bilinguals.

Myrthe van der Veen (BA Linguistics) reviews Paulien Cornelisse’s Taal voor de leuk. This book does not diverge from Cornelisse’s previous books with collections of columns on linguistic and often amusing situations. Cornelisse’s lively and ironic tone is praised, as well as her sharp observations.

Roos Kerrebijn (BA Nederlandse Taal en Cultuur) writes about Het vermogen te verlangen by Liesbeth Koenen, which is a collection of interviews with renowned linguists about their work. Roos finds the book accessible and interesting for both linguists and a wider audience.

Call for Papers – April 2019

Have you written a linguistics paper, research proposal or thesis you are proud of? Consider submitting your work to LingUU, the official, peer-reviewed, student journal of Linguistics at Utrecht University. In this journal, both undergraduate and graduate students can publish their papers.

The deadline for the next Call for Papers is April 14, 2019.

Why should I submit?

Students sometimes come up with ideas that are worth sharing and develop creative theories that more people should read, other than just the teacher. LingUU provides a way to make this happen while giving students the opportunity to get to know the world of academic publishing small-scale. Publishing in LingUU is a great learning experience for starting academics and enables you to improve your work through peer feedback.

What can I submit?

LingUU features articles from all subdisciplines of linguistics and publishes in both Dutch and English. Apart from full-blown articles, research proposals are also welcome for submission. Besides scientific articles, you can submit reports on internships abroad and book notices.

You can find examples of published articles in our archive.

How do I submit?

You want to submit; that’s great! Please read our guidelines for authors first, to make sure your work meets our requirements. Next, submit it through our online form, on April 14 at the latest. Within a few days after the deadline, you’ll receive more info about the reviewing and publication process.

If your paper is accepted (after revision), it will be published in the issue of November 2019, or in April 2020.

Questions?

If you have questions left, do not hesitate to contact via linguu.gw@uu.nl. You can also check the frequently asked questions first.

We’re looking forward to receiving your paper!

Submit your paper

LingUU 2.2 out now!

LingUU 2.2 is out now! The third issue of LingUU Journal features articles on various linguistic topics, written by students from different BA and MA programmes. Download the entire issue, browse through the contents, or order a paper copy (while supplies last).

Merel Hardeman, Héloïse Pierret & Anouk Scheffer (RMA Linguistics) compare two models of spoken word recognition: the Cohort model and the TRACE model. Their results indicate that priming with a matching rhyme results in faster response times to the target word than priming with a matching onset and nucleus. This is in line with the TRACE model.

Through a linguistic lens, Lisa Verbeek (RMA Linguistics) examines the emotional perception of self-names. She argues that self-names become Emotionally Competent Stimuli, such that affective memory traces have become part of word meaning, making self-names highly arousing words that are processed automatically and unconsciously.

Marlijne Boumeester (MSc Neuroscience and Cognition) proposes a study that questions bilingualism as a potential factor to delay age-related cognitive decline. She expects that the performance on the Simon task and the trail-making task will decline to the same extent in two age groups of monolinguals and bilinguals.

In a corpus study of Early Modern Dutch, Levi Remijnse (RMA Linguistics) analyses non-finite clauses headed by a present participle. Some constituents – prohibited from extraposition or raising – are located after this present participle. To account for this, Remijnse proposes that the present participle itself projects an extra projection containing a left-branching node (XP).

Bjorn Lichtenberg (BA Linguistics) reviews three models of force dynamicity. He compares their definition of force, their empirical coverage and their validity with respect to compositionality. According to Lichtenberg, Wolff’s model has the most expressional power, while the model by Copley and Harley is preferred in the light of compositionality.

Camilla Giannini (RMA Linguistics) investigates the the status of Occitan, a minority language in Italy, focusing on the development of this language, and on language planning and contemporary media as a way of maintenance. Giannini concludes that the desire of the speakers to promote their culture and traditions is still strong.

In this replication study, Tamara Muller, Lucia Koster & Ellen Hendriks (MA Communication and organisation) find more evidence for the conceptual metaphor theory. Participants rely on metaphors when they judge newspapers, expecting that heavier newspapers contain more important news. However, no evidence for grounded cognition was found.

Dylan Bonga and Jonathan Kamp (RMA Linguistics) examine the interaction between phonological and graphemical priming. They hypothesize that phonological and graphemic priming combined is stronger than only one type of priming. Using using a Lexical Decision Task, they could partly confirm this prediction.

Jaap Kruijt (MSc Artificial Intelligence) reports on his time in Edinburgh. A course on language evolution countered ideas he had encountered before. Using a method that he learned about in Edinburgh, he wrote his thesis on this topic.

Walther Glödstaf (RMA Linguistics) finds that Steven Pinker’s The Stuff of Thought makes a convincing case for the use of semantics in understanding the human mind. He regrets the occasional oversimplificiations and straw mans, but appreciates Pinker’s witty display of knowledge.

Myrthe Buckens (BA Linguistics) concludes that Taal om mee te spelen by Sjoerd van der Niet is best considered as a light-hearted introduction to language philosophy, intended for the general public.

Call for Papers – November 2018

Have you written a linguistics paper, research proposal or thesis you are proud of? Consider submitting your work to LingUU, the official, peer reviewed, student journal of Linguistics at Utrecht University. In this journal, both undergraduate and graduate students can publish their papers.

The deadline for the next Call for Papers is November 11, 2018.

Why should I submit?

Students sometimes come up with ideas that are worth sharing, and develop creative theories that more people should read, other than just the teacher. LingUU provides a way to make this happen, while giving students the opportunity to get to know the world of academic publishing small-scale. Publishing in LingUU is a great learning experience for starting academics and enables you to improve your work through peer feedback.

What can I submit?

LingUU features articles from all subdisciplines of linguistics and publishes in both Dutch and English. Apart from full-blown articles, research proposals are also welcome for submission. Besides scientific articles, you can submit reports on internships abroad and book notices.

You can find examples of published articles in our first issue.

How do I submit?

You want to submit; that’s great! Please read our guidelines for authors first, to make sure your work meets our requirements. Next, submit it through our online form, on November 11 at latest. Within a few days after the deadline, you’ll receive more info about the reviewing and publication process.

If your paper is accepted (after revision), it will be published in the issue of April 2019, or in November 2019.

Questions?

If you have questions left, do not hesitate to contact via linguu.gw@uu.nl. You can also check the frequently asked questions first.

We’re looking forward to receiving your paper!

Submit your paper